Woman Sports

In the 1930’s and 1940’s, Misericordia offered an array of sports, available for women to participate in. Such sports include archery, tennis, basketball, soccer, ice skating and many more. I know this because of several photos I viewed in  the archives. In theses photos, they show a group of women shooting arrows at targets, one woman shooting an arrow at a target while others watch, and a group photo of women holding their respected sports items such as the basketball, ice skates, and so forth. This makes me wonder what happened to these sports teams and when and why they started to fade out. I do not believe there is an archery team or ice skating team anymore; but was it because they weren’t popular, there was no one to teach it, or was it pushed out on purpose? These photos are more examples of women breaking the gender norms, and in the 1930’s at that. I wonder if things changed or became offered in light of the previous war or the upcoming war that occurred in the time period.

Misericordia, “Sports Heads,” media “photograph” (1939). University Photo  collections, RG905, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Misericordia  “Archery,” media  “photograph” , (1940). University Photo  collections, RG905, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Misericordia, “Unknown,” media “photograph” , (1920). University Photo collections, RG905, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Ex Communist

I found this one newspaper article in the archives from 1955. Dr. Bella Dodd came to Misericordia to discuss her time in the communist party. She came to discuss her book ‘School of Darkness’ and how she differed from her religion and chose the communist party. I found her interesting because she quit the party pretty close to the end of the war in 1948.  She decided to stay in the party through the war. I wonder if she was forced to stay or believed in what was happening. I would like to do some research on her, like her beliefs, why she joined the party, and why she stayed. It would have been very interesting to be there and listen to her talk. I would like to listen in on the questions asked and ask her questions about the party itself. I find the whole communist story line fascinating so hearing it from someone who was in the party would be a dream come true.

 

“Ex Communist to Lecture: Will Address students,”  Miss Recordia (April 26,1955). University Newspaper collections, RG830, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Peace Corps

In 1963, Miss Recordia, the school news paper published an article which discussed the peace corps recruiting a graduate to go to India and teach mathematics – science. The recruit was one of thirty two who agreed to help introduce English in the mathematics program in public high schools in Andhra Pradesh.  I would like to some research and see if this program is still active and how it recruits. For example, how did a student from a small catholic college in PA, USA get selected to go to India and participate? I wonder if programs like these are still happening and in other places. I feel like it would be a good idea to have programs like this in third world countries, just so kids are getting educated and learning English. What would be the requirements to be brought in to the organization and must there be a global reason for the group to be started, like war?

Miss Recordia, “Peace Corps Drafts June Graduate To Teach Math Science In India,” Newspaper media , (Sept. 25, 1963). University  Newspaper collections, RG830, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA.

Female Pilots

While going through the archives I stumbled upon a newspaper article about women looking toward the sky. Two women from Misericordia were looking to get their airplane licenses and complete their flight hours. This was written in 1955, but what was neat was that five years later there was a photo taken of two women in front of an airplane with different names. This leads me to believe that even more women were striving to make flying their career. After some quick research, in 1960 only a little over 21,000 woman had other than student pilot certificates and even today 97% of pilots are men. I found these two items fascinating because at least four women from our school were making strides in breaking normal gender roles. They followed what they enjoyed doing and made a career for themselves. This makes me wonder how long these types of classes lasted and how many women successfully graduated from the program.

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